Kau Kau Kitchen
by Leilehua Yuen

Holidays

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New Year
Chinese New Year
Valentineʻs Day
Makahiki
St Patrickʻs Day
Prince Kūhiō Day
Girls' Day
St. Patrick's Day
Vernal Equinox
Prince Kūhiō Day
Easter Sunday
Qing Ming
Lei Day
Boys' Day
Cinco de Mayo
Memorial Day
Kamehameha Day
Independance Day
O-Bon
Summer Solstice
Hawaiʻi Statehood Day
Labor Day
Atumnal Equinox
Explorers Day
Halloween
All Saints Day
All Souls Day
Election Day
Rising of the Pleiades
Makahiki
Thanksgiving
Advent
St. Nicholas Day
Pearl Harbor Day
Christmas Eve
Christmas Day
Hanukkah
New Year's Eve

 

























 

 


The holidays listed here are those most commonly observed by people living in the islands. They include traditional Hawaiian holidays, American holidays, holidays from around the world, and new and/or alternative holidays which I think are a great idea.


New Year

January 1 - Most people in Hawaiʻi celebrate the first day of the Gegorian Calendar, often with fireworks and parties. At midnight between the old year and the new, the cacophany and smoke can be overwhelming!

Pro Bowl

End of January

Chinese New Year

Movable - Mid-January to Late February

Chinese New Year or, more accurately, Lunar New Year, is based on an ancient lunisolar calendar that uses astronomical observations of the sunʻs longitude and the moon's phases. It occurs two new moons before the first day of spring. This means that the date of the lunar new year changes in relation to the Gregorian calendar now used internationally for civil time.Chinese New Year is celebrated based on Beijing, China time. This year the new moon falls on Feb 8 in both Hawai`i and China. The new moon before the first day of spring occurs on March 20 this year; the new moon before that occurs on March 8. There are many traditional activities and foods associated with the holiday. Learn more about them here.

Valentine's Day

February 14

Hina Matsuri - Girls' Day

March 3

St. Patrick's Day

March 17

Vernal Equinox

March 20

Prince Kūhiō Day

March 26

Easter Sunday

Varies

Quing Ming

15th Day After Spring Equinox (April 4 or 5)

Lei Day

May 1

Tango no Sekku - Boys' Day

May 5

Cinco de Mayo

May 5

Memorial Day

Last Monday in May

Kamehameha Day

June 11

Independance Day

July 4

O-Bon

June through August

Summer Solstice

June 20 or 21

Hawaiʻi Statehood Day

August 19

Labor Day

Fist Monday in September

Autumnal Equinox

September 22 or 23

Explorers' Day

Second Monday of October

Halloween

October 31

All Saints' Day

November 1

All Souls' Day

November 2

Election Day

November 8 (In 2016)

Rising of the Pleiades

November 17

Makahiki - the Hawaiian New Year

Movable

Long before Christmas was celebrated in Hawai`i, we had our own winter holiday - the Makahiki. Makahiki can be a confusing word. It means "year," "new year," and also refers to the four month long season which heralds the new year in the Hawaiian calendar. In ancient times, as the old year drew to a close, the priests associated with certain temples on the western side of each inhabited Hawaiian island would watch for the appearance of Makali`i - the Pleiades - a star cluster which appears in the evening sky in our October. When the priests could finally distinguish Makali`i in the eastern sky shortly after sunset, they announced the next new moon would begin the Makahiki season. This was a time when warfare and most work were prohibited and the people celebrated with games and sports.

Thanksgiving Day

Movable, fourth Thursday in November

Sundays in Advent

Movable, the four Sundays before Christmas

Saint Nicholas Day

December 6

Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day

December 7

Winter Solstice

December 21 or 22

Christmas Eve

December 24

Christmas Day

December 25

Hanukkah

Movable

New Year's Eve

December 31